Bulking

This Is the Finest Macronutrient Calculator on the Internet (Up to date 2020)

Are you just looking for the Legion's macronutrient calculator and nothing else? You are welcome:

Which device do you want to use?

How much do you weigh? (in the lbs)

How tall are you? (in the ft / in)

How old are you?

Your basic metabolic rate (BMR) is …

Your total daily energy consumption (TDEE) is …

To lose weight, you should consume the following calories and macronutrients every day:

0 calories

protein

0 kcal


carbohydrates

0 kcal

fat

0 kcal

Would you like to learn how to find out your macronutrients (“macros”) to lose fat, build lean muscle or maintain your weight? Continue reading!

The central theses

A macronutrient is a nutrient that your body needs in large quantities to survive. The main ones are protein, carbohydrates and fat.
If you want to build muscle, lose fat, and become strong, you may want to follow a high-protein, medium to carbohydrate, medium to low-fat diet.
Read on to find out exactly how much protein, carbohydrates and fat you should eat to get the body you want.

You probably know that exercise alone is not enough to build muscle and lose fat.

And that ultimately your success or failure is determined by your diet.

Think of it like this:

If your body were a car, exercise is the accelerator and diet is the fuel in the tank. You have to accelerate (exercise) to move (improve yours Body composition), but how far can you get without enough right fuel?

My point is this:

If you know how to properly manage your diet, building muscle and burning fat is easy and straightforward.
If you don't, it will be difficult, if not impossible, to get fit, slim, and strong.

And if you're like most people, you're likely to fall into the latter camp.

It's a shame that so many people get it wrong because it's really easy to do it right.

The problem, however, is the amount of conflicting information about how to get fit. Books, blogs and Magazines Abundance, but finding something that actually works as promised is like chasing the proverbial needle in a haystack.

At this point, you may even be wondering if something really works.

Things will improve, however, because this article will get you on the fast lane to success.

In the end you will understand the easiest and most effective way to eat Build muscle and strength and get well:

Macronutrient-based diet (also known as) flexible diet). With it you can transform your body without. . .

To starve
Eliminate all foods you like, including carbohydrates and sugar
Eating at set meal times
Suffering from hunger and cravings

Ready to learn how?

Continue reading.

What are macronutrients?



A Macronutrientor “macro” is any nutrient that humans need in relatively large quantities to survive.

Most people consider macros only as protein, carbohydrates and fat, but technically speaking, the term also includes water and minerals like calcium, zinc, iron, magnesium and phosphorus.

But for the purposes of Diet and meal planning– the main topic of this article – we will focus on protein, carbohydrates and fat.

The simple science of the macronutrient diet

If you've browsed the Instagram fitness scene, you've no doubt seen it:

Shredded boys and girls sharing pictures of pancake stacks or huge bowls of Rocky Road ice cream or other "sinful" indulgences.

Or maybe you've witnessed one of Dwayne Johnson's epic seizures:

And you probably wondered what the hell was going on.

You may not be able to eat and have this ripple six packs, can you? It was like one cheat meal for the month (or the year?) or something, right?

And lo and behold … these people really eat the stuff. And much more often than you might think.

The reason why they can "get away with it" is as follows:

When it comes to yours Body compositionWhat you eat is not nearly as important as how much you eat.

That is, the Number of calories we eat and how they crumble protein, carbohydrates, and fat affects our body more than the choice of food and when we eat it.

Summary: The reason why people can regularly eat "fraudulent meals" is because they control their total calorie intake. This determines whether you gain, lose, or maintain your weight.

Yes, count calories and here's why

The relationship between the energy you eat and the energy you burn is known as Energy balance.

Scientists use the term when discussing the energy balance Kilocalorie, or just calorie in short, that's the amount of energy it takes to heat you kilogram Water one degree Celsius.

The energy balance is an important concept to understand because it alone determines how your body weight changes in response to the food you eat (and therefore how many calories you should be consuming depending on your goals).

If we look beyond that Magazine shelves and pill and powder Hucksters on scientific literature, we quickly learn two things:

You need to burn more energy than you use to achieve meaningful weight loss.
You need to use more energy than you burn to achieve meaningful weight gain (both fat and muscle).
You need to use more or less energy to maintain your body weight.

In other words, body weight management consists mainly of calories versus calories versus.

Some people disagree with this point. You will often say that "calories don't count" or "calorie counting doesn't work" and take the opposing position: that you don't have to be careful how much you eat as much as What you eat.

The sales pitch sounds sexy. If you eat the right foods, you can clog and boost your hormones and metabolism, and your body will take care of the rest. This is music for many people who want to believe that they can become slim and fit, without ever having to limit or pay attention how much they just eat What.

That is Malarkey. In fact, it's worse than that. It's an obvious lie, because of your body weight, how much you eat far more important than what you eat.

Do not you believe me?

Just ask Professor Mark Haub of Kansas State University who lost 27 pounds in 10 weeks eat hostess cupcakes, Doritos, Oreos and whey protein shakes. Or a science teacher, John Cisna, who lost 56 pounds in six months eat nothing but McDonalds. Or Kai Sedgwick, a fitness enthusiast who got into the best shape of his life after a strict training routine and eat McDonalds every day for a month.

I don't recommend following in their footsteps (the nutritional value of your diet matters), but they prove to be an indisputable point: you can lose fat and gain muscle while eating plenty of junk food.

This is also the reason why bodybuilders who go back as far, from the “father of modern bodybuilding” Eugen Sandow to sword sandal superstar Steve Reeves to legendary Arnold Schwarzenegger, use this knowledge to systematically and routinely reduce the body and increase fat content as desired.

Nor are these anecdotes, hypotheses or exposed theories. This is the first law of thermodynamics at work, which states that energy cannot be generated or destroyed in a system, but can only change shape.

This applies to all physical energy systems, including human metabolism. When we eat, the stored energy is converted into mechanical energy (movement) by our muscles, chemical energy (body fat) from our digestive systems and heat energy (heat) from our organs.

This alone explains why every single controlled weight loss study Performed in the past 100 years has found that significant weight loss requires energy consumption to exceed energy consumption.

However, all of this evidence does not mean you to have Counting calories to lose weight, but it means understanding how calorie intake and consumption affect your body weight, and then regulating your intake according to your goals.

If you understand the central role of the energy balance in determining body weight, you can also understand why no food directly helps us lose more weight than another.

Food has no special properties that make it "good" or "bad" for weight loss. However, what they do have are different amounts of calories and protein, carbohydrates and fat, and that means that some foods are better at losing weight or gaining weight than others.

Read: The best "weight loss foods" (thankfully) are not what you think

Note that I said better, not best, mandatory, forbidden, or anything that smells like dogma, because knowing how to properly regulate and balance your food intake can help you eat almost anything and lose weight.

That is, if you don't just want to lose Weightbut lose fat and no muscle (and maybe even build muscle), you need to balance both your "macros" and your calories.

Summary: The relationship between the number of calories you eat and burn determines whether you gain, lose, or maintain your weight. Basically, weight loss, weight gain, and maintenance are a function of calorie intake versus calorie expenditure.

How to find out your macros


best macro calculator


I think I pointed out that a calorie is a calorie when it comes to weight. No matter how healthy or clean the food may be, if you eat too much of it, you will do not lose weight.

So if you follow a nutritionally bankrupt junk food diet but keep your calorie intake below your expenses, you will lose weight.

BUT!

If your goal is to build muscle and lose fat – to optimize body composition – and to maintain or improve your health, a calorie is not a calorie.

A carefully controlled diet with junk food will no longer cut it.

In this case, the macronutrient profile of the individual foods you eat is of great importance.

You see, people may say they want to "lose weight" or "gain weight", but what we really mean is that they want to Lose fat and not muscle and Build muscle and not fat. And that makes some calories much more important than others.

For example, carbohydrates and protein have more or less the same amount of calories per gram, but protein is much more important for muscle building and fat loss.

Let's talk about why …

Why you should eat a lot of protein

While the scientific search for the "One True Diet" continues, we know one thing for sure: it will be high in protein.

study A study has already confirmed that a high-protein diet is superior to the low-protein diet in almost every way. In particular, research shows that people who eat more protein:

Protein intake is even more important if you exercise regularly because this increases your body's protein requirements.

It is also important if you restrict Your calories to lose fat because eating enough protein plays an important role in maintaining muscle mass during a diet.

Protein intake is also important in sedentary people. Studies show that such people lose muscle faster with age if they do not eat enough protein. The faster they lose muscle, the more likely they are to die of any cause.

So if you want to be slim, strong, muscular and healthy, you want to eat a lot of protein. How much?

Read this article if you want a detailed answer …

How much protein do I need? The final (and scientifically sound) answer

… But the long story is that when you cut (fat loss diet) you want to eat at least 1 to 1.2 grams of protein per pound of body weight a day.

And if you are lean (diet to maximize muscle growth) or maintain (diet to maintain body composition), you should eat at least 0.8 to 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight per day.

However, if you have over 20 percent body fat as a man or over 30 percent body fat as a woman, this formula overestimates your protein requirements (for example, a 5 10 10 and 250 pound man does not need 250 grams of protein per day).

In this case, it's better to adjust your protein intake to 40 percent of your daily calories.

For most people, this rule of 1 to 1.2 grams per pound per day roughly corresponds to:

40 percent of the calories when cutting
25 percent of calories with lean mass
30 percent of calories in maintenance

Summary: To optimize your body composition, you should eat about 1 to 1.2 grams of protein per pound of body weight a day when cutting (or 40 percent of your daily calories if you have over 20 percent body fat as a man or 30 percent as a woman) and 0.8 to 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight per day if they are lean or fit.

Why you should probably eat lots of carbohydrates

how many carbohydrates podcast

Google "How Many Carbohydrates Should I Eat?" and you will find all kinds of answers from all kinds of trainers and "Gurus. ”

Many believe that little carbohydrates is the way to go. Others say it's just a fad. And then there are those who are somewhere in the middle.

Here I am:

If you are healthy and physically active, and especially if you regularly lift weights, it is likely that you will do better with more carbohydrates in your diet, not less.

And yes, this applies equally to muscle building and fat loss. The reality is that a relatively high-carbohydrate diet can help you work faster and easier.

You can read This post To learn why, but the biggest factor is that you eat more carbohydrates, you can exercise better, which leads to more muscle building and fat loss over time.

So how many carbohydrates should you eat then?

The detailed answer can be found in this article …

How to know exactly how many carbohydrates you should eat

… But the essence is that you want to eat about 1 to 3 grams of carbohydrates per pound of body weight a day, which is about roughly for most people:

40 percent of the calories when cutting
55 percent of calories with lean mass
45 percent of calories in maintenance

However, if you have over 20 percent body fat as a man or over 30 percent body fat as a woman, this formula overestimates your carbohydrate requirement (for example, a woman with 5 4 4 and 200 pounds does not need 200 to 600 grams of carbohydrates per day).

Therefore, I recommend overweight people to adjust their carbohydrate intake to 30 percent of their daily calories.

Summary: To optimize your body composition, you should eat about 1 to 3 grams of carbohydrates per pound of body weight per day, which is about 40 to 55 percent of calories for most people. If you have over 20 percent body fat as a man or 30 percent body fat as a woman, adjust your carbohydrate intake to 30 percent of your daily calories.

Why you probably don't have to eat as much fat as you think

Dietary fat is the macronutrient du jour.

No matter what you want to fix with your body or do in the gym, eating more fat is said to help. Fat loss, vitality, libido, muscle and strength gains – everything can be yours if you follow this "a strange diet trick".

This is a strong marketing message because it is simple, not intuitive and provides logical coverage for what many people want to do anyway (eat delicious fatty foods).

There's only one problem:

As you learned earlier, the biggest catch used to sell people on a high-fat diet – faster fat loss – is scientifically bankrupt. And if it works, it's only because of a significant reduction in caloric intake that leads to a greater calorie deficit, not metabolic voodoo.

Another catch is hormones. In particular, some people claim that a high-fat diet optimizes your hormone profile, which in turn improves every aspect of your health and well-being.

In men, the focus is usually on testosterone and its effects on body composition, in women on reproductive hormones and their effects on fertility and menstruation.

While it is true that too little fat affects hormone production and increasing intake can improve hormone production, the effects are far less dramatic than you might think.

In addition, the physiological differences between a low-fat diet that provides 20 percent of the daily calories from fat, for example, and a high-fat diet that delivers twice as much are negligible.

For example a study The study, carried out by scientists from the National Cancer Institute, included analyzing the hormone levels of 43 men who followed two diets that supplied different amounts of dietary fat.

The researchers divided the men into two groups:

Group one received 19 percent of their calories from fat.
Group two got 41 percent of their calories from fat.

After five and a half months, the scientists found that the men in the high-fat group had only 13 percent higher testosterone levels than those in the low-fat group – far too little of a difference to affect strength and muscle building.

That's not to say that a high-fat diet is inherently bad, just that it doesn't guarantee much in terms of fat loss, muscle building, or improved health.

In addition, the two main disadvantages of a high-fat diet are:

It makes it very easy to overeat because high-fat foods generally contain more calories and are less filling than carbohydrate and protein-rich foods.
It often leaves scarce calories for protein and carbohydrates, which, as you now know, are extremely helpful in improving your body composition.

So my usual recommendation is to eat enough fat to maintain your health, enjoy your meals, and stay satisfied, but not so much that you often overeat or have difficulty eating enough protein and carbohydrates.

And how much fat is that per day?

You can read this article for the detailed answer …

How to know exactly how many carbohydrates you should eat

… But the TL; DR is that you want to gain about 20 to 30 percent of your calories from fat, regardless of whether you cut, get lean, or maintain.

In particular, I recommend most people to adjust their fat intake to the following:

20 percent of calories when cutting and lean bulking
Maintaining 25 to 30 percent of calories

And if you have over 20 percent body fat as a man or 30 percent body fat as a woman, I recommend getting 30 percent of your calories from fat. (If you're careful, you'll find that your macros are 40 percent protein, 30 percent carbohydrate, and 30 percent fat.)

Summary: To optimize your body composition, you get about 20 percent of your calories from fat when you cut and lean, and 25 to 30 percent from calories when you maintain.

How to find out your calories and macros

Which device do you want to use?

How much do you weigh? (in the lbs)

How tall are you? (in the ft / in)

How old are you?

Your basic metabolic rate (BMR) is …

Your total daily energy consumption (TDEE) is …

To lose weight, you should consume the following calories and macronutrients every day:

0 calories

protein

0 kcal


carbohydrates

0 kcal

fat

0 kcal

Let us learn how this calculator works.

First enter the following:

Your weight
your height
Your age
Your activity level
Your goal for body composition

And then it calculates:

Your basal metabolic rate (BMR)
Your daily total energy consumption (TDEE)
Your target calorie and macronutrient intake

Let's take a minute to discuss each of these features.

Step 1: calculate your basal metabolic rate


best macro calculator app


Your basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the amount of energy your body would burn if you were to be motionless for a day without food. In other words, it is the minimum amount of energy it takes to stay alive for 24 hours.

It's called that because basal means "forming a basis, fundamental".

Unless you are extremely active, your BMR accounts for most of your energy consumption. For example, your brain alone burns about 10 calories an hour. For this reason, it is very important for successful weight loss and successful maintenance that your metabolism works optimally.

For example, I am 34 years old and weigh 195 pounds. My BMR is around 1,900 calories. I say "about" because you can never really know how many calories you burn each day without doing fancy lab tests (and even then it will vary slightly from day to day).

Fortunately, you don't have to do this to achieve your goals. You just need to do a simple arithmetic to get a good estimate.

There are a number of mathematical formulas that you can use to calculate your BMR.

The one I like the most for our purposes here is known as Mifflin-St. Jeor equation that was introduced 1990 by scientists from the University of Nevada to address some of the shortcomings of an older formula, the Harris Benedict equation.

Here is Mifflin-St. Jeor equation for men:

BMR = 10 x weight (in kilograms) + 6.25 x height (in centimeters) – 5 x age (in years) + 5

If this looks like Greek to you, don't worry – all you have to do is solve from left to right:

Multiply your weight in kilograms by 10.
Multiply your height in centimeters by 6.25.
Add up these two numbers.
Multiply your age in years by 5.
Subtract the result from the sum of steps 1 and 2.
Add 5 to the result.

Let's see how that affects a 200-pound man who is 5 feet 11 inches tall and 41 years old.

First, he has to convert his weight to kilograms, which is achieved by dividing the number of pounds by 2.2. So 200 / 2.2 = 90.9, which we will round up to 91 kilograms.

Then he has to multiply this by 10: 91 x 10 = 910.

The next step is to convert its size to centimeters, which is achieved by multiplying the number of inches by 2.54. So 71 x 2.54 = 180 centimeters.

Then he has to multiply this by 6.25: 180 x 6.25 = 1.125.

Next he has to add these two numbers: 910 + 1,125 = 2,035.

Then multiply your age in years by 5 (41 x 5 = 205) and subtract the result from the above sum: 2,035 – 205 = 1,830.

And finally you add 5 to this number: 1,830 + 5 = 1,835.

So this man's BMR is about 1,800 calories.

Do you want to get to know yours? Take a break and calculate it now!

You need to know it soon anyway. If you'd rather skip the math, just scroll up and use the Legion Macronutrient Calculator.

Step 2: calculate your total daily energy consumption


What should my macronutrients be?


Your total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) is exactly what it sounds like: the total number of calories you burn every 24 hours.

Your TDEE consists of your BMR plus all of the additional energy that is consumed during physical activity and the digestion and processing of the food you consume.

"Food burns energy?" You may be wondering.

Yes, sir, food costs energy to digest, process and absorb, and different types of food cost more energy than others.

Technically, this is known as that thermal effect of foodor TEF as well Thermogenesis, and research shows that it makes up about 10 percent of TDEE.

In this way, your metabolism “speeds up” when you eat and the size of the boost depends on several factors:

For example protein costs to consume and store most of the energy, followed by carbohydrates and then dietary fat.

Studies also show that the thermal effect of highly processed foods is significantly less than that of whole foods.

This is one of the factors contributing to the obesity epidemic, as a diet consists primarily of processed foods Results with less energy consumption than one that is rich in whole foods, which makes it easier to accidentally overeat.

How much food you eat in one session

Smaller meals lead to a smaller increase in energy consumption and larger meals lead to a larger increase.

Some people only to have naturally faster metabolism than others (bastards). Don't worry, the differences are usually very small.

This helps explain why a number of Studies to have shown that high-protein, high-carbohydrate diets are best suited to maximize fat loss. There are other factors, of course, but the significant increase in TEF is certainly one of them.

How do you calculate your TDEE?

First, you need to know your BMR that you just calculated, and then you need to consider the extra energy you burn, which takes a bit more work.

There are several ways to calculate how many calories you burn through exercise and physical activity, including activity trackers, exercise machines, and math methods.

Unfortunately activity tracker Not very exactly. They often overestimate how many calories you burn, which makes them more or less useless.

Exercise equipment can be just as bad. For example a analysis carried out by scientists at the University of California-San Francisco found that on average:

Stationary bicycles overestimated calorie consumption by 7 percent.
Stair climbers overestimated by 12 percent.
Treadmills overestimated by 13 percent.
Elliptical trainer overestimated by 42 percent (ouch).

The most accurate way to estimate your TDEE is to use multiple math models to estimate your basal metabolic rate and how many calories you burn through physical activity and TEF. However, this is time consuming, complicated and exaggerated.

Instead, you can use a link on the back of the napkin to get a reasonably accurate estimate of your average TDEE.

This method is based on what is called Activity multipliersThese are numbers (which vary depending on what you enter activity Level) multiply your BMR by to calculate your approximate TDEE.

Most TDEE calculators on the Internet use activity multipliers from a formula called Katch-McArdle Formula. Unfortunately, I've found that these multipliers often exceed people's actual TDEEs.

Therefore, when calculating your TDEE, I recommend the following slightly modified activity multipliers, with which I also created the Legion macronutrient calculator:

BMR x 1.15 = lack of exercise (little or no exercise)

BMR x 1.2 to 1.35 = light activity (1 to 3 hours of exercise or sport per week)

BMR x 1.4 to 1.55 = moderate activity (4 to 6 hours of exercise or sport per week)

BMR x 1.6 to 1.75 = very active (7 to 9 hours of exercise or sport per week)

BMR x 1.8 to 1.95 = extra active (10+ hours of exercise or sport per week)

Of course, these calculations don't tell you how much energy you use on any given day, but they do give you a reasonable estimate of the average amount of energy you use each day based on how active you are.

Fortunately, this snapshot of your average daily energy consumption is all you need for reliable fat loss and muscle building. It also makes creating meal plans a breeze, which works wonders for long-term compliance.

Let's see how this math works for me.

We already know that my BMR is around 1,900 calories and I do four to six hours of moderate exercise a week.

According to the calculations above, my TDEE should be about 2,700 calories (1,900 x 1.4), give or take about a hundred calories.

And that's empirically correct, since my diet currently provides about 2,700 calories a day, which means that my current body composition is perfectly preserved. Was mehr ist, wenn ich absichtlich weniger esse, verliere ich Fett und wenn ich absichtlich mehr esse, nehme ich Fett zu.

Schritt 3: Berechnen Sie Ihre tägliche Kalorien- und Makronährstoffaufnahme

Sobald Sie Ihren durchschnittlichen TDEE berechnet haben, können Sie herausfinden, wie viele Kalorien Sie täglich essen sollten.

Der erste Schritt, um dies herauszufinden, besteht darin, zu bestimmen, was Sie mit Ihrer Körperzusammensetzung tun möchten.

Wenn Sie Fett verlieren möchten, müssen Sie weniger Kalorien essen, als Sie verbrennen.

Dies ist bekannt als Schneiden.

Wenn Sie Muskeln aufbauen und gleichzeitig die Fettzunahme minimieren möchten, müssen Sie etwas mehr Kalorien essen, als Sie verbrennen.

Dies ist bekannt als Lean Bulking.

Wenn Sie Ihr aktuelles Gewicht und Ihre Körperzusammensetzung beibehalten möchten, müssen Sie mehr oder weniger essen, wie viele Kalorien Sie verbrennen.

Dies ist bekannt als Aufrechterhaltung.

Lassen Sie uns überlegen, wie das alles funktioniert.

Stellen Sie Ihre Kalorien und Makros zum Schneiden ein

Wenn es Ihr Ziel ist, Fett so schnell wie möglich zu verlieren und gleichzeitig Muskel- und Kraftverlust, Müdigkeit und die anderen negativen Nebenwirkungen einer Diät zu minimieren, möchten Sie ein aggressives, aber nicht rücksichtsloses Kaloriendefizit von etwa 25 Prozent aufrechterhalten.

Mit anderen Worten, wenn Sie schneiden, empfehle ich Ihnen, etwa 75 Prozent Ihres durchschnittlichen TDEE zu essen. Für die meisten Menschen sind dies 10 bis 12 Kalorien pro Pfund Körpergewicht pro Tag.

Zum Beispiel haben wir festgestellt, dass mein durchschnittlicher TDEE 2.700 Kalorien beträgt. Wenn ich also schneide, sollte ich meine Kalorien auf etwa 2.000 (2.700 x 0,75) senken. Und genau das mache ich, wenn ich Fett verlieren muss, und es hat mir ermöglicht, sehr schlank zu werden, ohne von Muskelverlust zu sprechen.

Ich habe diese 25-Prozent-Zahl auch nicht aus dem Nichts ausgewählt.

Studien zeigen, dass es in Kombination mit Krafttraining und hoher Proteinaufnahme sowohl beim Fettabbau als auch beim Muskelerhalt hervorragend funktioniert.

Zum Beispiel a study Von Wissenschaftlern der Universität Jyväskylä (Finnland) durchgeführt, teilten Leichtathletikspringer und Sprinter auf nationaler und internationaler Ebene mit niedrigem Körperfettanteil (bei oder unter 10 Prozent) in zwei Gruppen auf:

Eine kleine Kaloriendefizitgruppe, die ein 300-Kalorien-Defizit aufrechterhielt (etwa 12 Prozent unter TDEE).
Eine große Kaloriendefizitgruppe, die ein 750-Kalorien-Defizit aufrechterhielt (etwa 25 Prozent unter TDEE).

Nach vier Wochen verlor die kleine Kaloriendefizitgruppe sehr wenig Fett und Muskeln, und die große Kaloriendefizitgruppe verlor durchschnittlich etwa vier Pfund Fett und sehr wenig Muskeln. Keine der Gruppen hatte nennenswerte negative Nebenwirkungen.

Wenn Sie also schnell Fett verlieren möchten, ohne Muskeln zu verlieren, möchten Sie ein Kaloriendefizit von etwa 25 Prozent pro Tag aufrechterhalten.

Sobald Sie Ihre Schnittkalorien berechnet haben, müssen Sie sie nur noch in tägliche Makronährstoffziele umwandeln, indem Sie die Prozentsätze verwenden, die Sie zuvor in diesem Artikel gelernt haben:

40 Prozent Ihrer Kalorien sollten aus Eiweiß stammen.
40 Prozent Ihrer Kalorien sollten aus Kohlenhydraten stammen.
20 Prozent Ihrer Kalorien sollten aus Nahrungsfett stammen.

Protein und Kohlenhydrate enthalten ungefähr vier Kalorien pro Gramm, und Nahrungsfett enthält ungefähr neun Kalorien pro Gramm. Alles, was Sie tun müssen, um Ihre Makros herauszufinden, ist Folgendes:

Multiplizieren Sie Ihre tägliche Kalorienaufnahme mit 0,4 und dividieren Sie das Ergebnis durch 4, um Ihre tägliche Proteinzufuhr (in Gramm) zu ermitteln.
Multiplizieren Sie Ihre tägliche Kalorienaufnahme mit 0,4 und dividieren Sie das Ergebnis durch 4, um Ihre tägliche Kohlenhydrataufnahme zu ermitteln.
Multiplizieren Sie Ihre tägliche Zielkalorienaufnahme mit 0,2 und dividieren Sie das Ergebnis durch 9, um Ihre tägliche Zielfettaufnahme zu ermitteln.

Am Beispiel meiner Person würde mein tägliches Kalorienziel (2.000) in Protein, Kohlenhydrate und Fett zerfallen:

2.000 x 0,4 = 800 Kalorien aus Protein

2.000 x 0,4 = 800 Kalorien aus Kohlenhydraten

2.000 x 0,2 = 400 Kalorien aus Fett

Teilen Sie dann die Protein- und Kohlenhydratkalorien durch vier und die Fettkalorien durch neun.

800/4 = 200 Gramm Protein

800/4 = 200 Gramm Kohlenhydrate

400/9 = ~ 45 Gramm Fett

Wenn alles gesagt und getan ist, sind meine täglichen Kalorien- und Makronährstoffziele für das Schneiden wie folgt:

2.000 Kalorien
200 Gramm Protein
200 Gramm Kohlenhydrate
45 Gramm Fett

With these numbers in hand, I can then create a cutting meal plan that allows me to lose fat like clockwork by hitting these targets every day with foods I like to eat.

Read this article to learn how:

The Definitive Guide to Effective Meal Planning

Set Your Calories and Macros for Lean Bulking

Unless you’re new to proper weightlifting, you need to maintain a slight calorie surplus over time to gain an appreciable amount of muscle.

This is because a calorie surplus boosts muscle protein synthesis, increases anabolic and decreases catabolic hormone levels, and improves workout performance. All of that adds up to significantly better muscle and strength gains over time.

In other words, when calories are abundant, your body’s “muscle-building machinery” fires on all cylinders, and when calories are restricted, it can’t get out of first gear.

You don’t want to eat too many more calories than you’re burning, however, because after a point, increasing food intake no longer boosts muscle growth but just fat gain instead.

So, how large should your calorie surplus be to maximize muscle growth while minimizing fat gain?

A lot less than you might imagine.

A study conducted by scientists at the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences provides an illustrative example of why. The researchers divided 39 elite athletes from a variety of different sports (rowing, soccer, ice hockey, etc.) into two groups:

1. Group one followed a meal plan created by a nutritionist to produce an increase of 0.7 percent of body weight per week.

This entailed increasing the participants’ calorie intake from about 2,800 to 3,600 calories per day, a 28 percent calorie surplus on average. I’ll refer to this group as the “30-percent-surplus group.”

2. Group two was encouraged to eat more calories than they burned every day, but didn’t follow a precise meal plan. This group essentially used intuitive eating to maintain a slight calorie surplus.

They ended up increasing their calorie intake from about 2,900 to 3,200 calories per day, a 10 percent calorie surplus on average. I’ll refer to this group as the “10-percent-surplus group.”

Both groups also lifted weights four times per week in addition to continuing their sport-specific training, training each major muscle group twice per week. Everyone followed their diet and exercise plans for 8 to 12 weeks (depending on how much weight they wanted to gain).

The researchers measured the participants’ weight and body composition using dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) before and after the study.

The result?

Both groups gained almost the exact same amount of muscle, but the 30 percent surplus group increased their body fat by about 20 percent, whereas the 10 percent surplus group lost a small amount of body fat.

Here’s a chart showing both group’s body fat levels during the study:

calorie calculator

(The dotted line represents the 30-percent-surplus group, and the solid line represents the 10-percent-surplus group).

And here’s a chart showing both group’s muscle gain during the study:


tdee calculator


As you can see, the 10-percent surplus-group gained just as much muscle as the 30-percent-surplus group, despite gaining almost no body fat.

The results of this study also nicely conform to what I’ve experienced with my own body and working with thousands of others:

The point of diminishing returns when lean bulking is somewhere around 110 percent of your average TDEE.

That is, you’ll likely gain just as much muscle eating about 110 percent of your average TDEE as you would eating 120 or 130 percent but a lot less fat.

And so that’s my recommendation for lean bulking: eat about 110 percent of your average TDEE. For most people, this comes out to 16 to 18 calories per pound of body weight per day.

For me, this would mean eating about 3,000 calories per day (2,700 x 1.1). And again, this is exactly what I do when I want to start a lean bulking phase, and it results in slow and steady muscle gain with minimal fat gain.

In the beginning of this section, I said you need to maintain a slight calorie surplus over time to gain an appreciable amount of muscle . . . unless you’re new to proper weightlifting.

The reason for this is that in your first three to six months of weightlifting, you can build muscle at a much faster rate than usual, because your body is hyper-responsive to your training.

During this “newbie gains” phase, as it’s called, you can probably benefit from closer to a 15 to 20 percent calorie surplus. You’ll gain more fat than if you ate fewer calories, of course, but you’ll also gain substantially more muscle.

That said, I still typically tell newbies to aim for a calorie surplus of around 10 percent above TDEE.

Why?

Because most people tend to eat a bit more than they intend to while lean bulking anyway, and this is especially true of people who are new to proper dieting and weightlifting.

That is, instead of telling a novice to eat 120 percent of their TDEE every day, I tell them to aim for 110 percent and allow themselves a few larger meals per week during these first several months.

So, once you have your lean bulking calories worked out, you just need to turn them into daily macronutrient targets using the percentages you learned earlier in this article:

25 percent of your calories should come from protein.
55 percent of your calories should come from carbohydrate.
20 percent of your calories should come from dietary fat.

To figure this out, do the following:

Multiply your target daily calorie intake by 0.25 and divide the result by 4 to figure out your target daily protein intake.
Multiply your target daily calorie intake by 0.55 and divide the result by 4 to figure out your target daily carbohydrate intake.
Multiply your target daily calorie intake by 0.2 and divide the result by 9 to figure out your target daily fat intake.

Using myself as an example again, here’s how my daily calorie target (3,000) would break down into protein, carbs, and fat:

3,000 x 0.25 = 750 calories from protein

3,000 x 0.55 = 1,650 calories from carbs

3,000 x 0.2 = 600 calories from fat

Then, divide the protein and carb calories by four and the fat calories by nine.

750 / 4 = ~190 grams of protein

1,650 / 4 = ~410 grams of carbs

600 / 9 = ~65 grams of fat

When it’s all said and done, my daily calorie and macronutrient targets for lean bulking are as follows:

3,000 calories
190 grams of protein
410 grams of carbs
65 grams of fat

With these numbers in hand, I can then create a lean bulking meal plan that allows me to gain muscle like clockwork by hitting these targets every day with foods I like to eat.

Read this article to learn more about how to lean bulk as effectively as possible:

The Ultimate Guide to Bulking Up (Without Just Getting Fat)

Set Your Calories and Macros for Maintaining

This shouldn’t really come into play until you’ve completed several cycles of cutting and lean bulking and more or less have the body you want.

You use your lean bulking phases to add muscle and your cutting phases to strip away fat, and along the way, assess your physique to see how far you still have to go to look the way you want to look.

Eventually, you’ll cut down to a lean body fat percentage and absolutely love what you see in the mirror. This will be one of the most rewarding experiences you’ll have in your fitness journey.

Calculating your maintenance calories is straightforward. There are two ways to do it:

1. Eat the same amount every day.

This would be your average TDEE, and for most people, it comes out to around 14 to 16 calories per pound of body weight per day.

Practical speaking, this will mean that some days you’ll be in a slight calorie deficit and other days a slight surplus. Das ist gut. They will balance out to neither weight loss nor gain over the course of weeks, months, and even years if you so desire.

2. Eat more on the days that you’re more active and less on the days that you’re less active.

This requires that you estimate your energy expenditure each day and eat accordingly.

I prefer the first option because it’s the simplest, but the second can be better for people who are very active on certain days and very inactive on others. If you’re one of those people (or just want to give the second method a try), read this article to learn how to make this work:

How to Use Calorie Cycling to Build Muscle and Lose Fat

If you want to go with the first option, half your work is already done.

You’ve already figured out your TDEE, so now all you have to do is convert it into macronutrient targets.

Using myself as an example again, my TDEE is 2,700 calories per day, so that’s how much I’ll want to eat per day to maintain my weight.

Here’s how to turn your maintenance calories into macros:

30 percent of your calories should come from protein.
40 percent of your calories should come from carbohydrate.
25 percent of your calories should come from dietary fat.

Which means all you have to do to figure out your macros is the following:

Multiply your target daily calorie intake by 0.3 and divide the result by 4 to figure out your target daily protein intake.
Multiply your target daily calorie intake by 0.45 and divide the result by 4 to figure out your target daily carbohydrate intake.
Multiply your target daily calorie intake by 0.25 and divide the result by 9 to figure out your target daily fat intake.

Using myself as an example, here’s how my daily calorie target (2,700) would break down into protein, carbs, and fat:

2,700 x 0.3 = 810 calories from protein

2,700 x 0.4 = 1,080 calories from carbs

2,700 x 0.25 = 675 calories from fat

Then, divide the protein and carb calories by four and the fat calories by nine.

810 / 4 = ~200 grams of protein

1,080 / 4 = 270 grams of carbs

675 / 9 = 75 grams of fat

When it’s all said and done, my daily calorie and macronutrient targets for lean bulking are as follows:

2,700 calories
200 grams of protein
270 grams of carbs
75 grams of fat

With these numbers in hand, I can then create a maintenance plan that allows me to maintain my body composition with ease by hitting these targets every day with foods I like to eat.

At this point, you can also start experimenting with intuitive eating principles—eating by “feel”—instead of rigidly following a meal plan every day.

Check out this article to learn how:

Can Intuitive Eating Help You Get the Body You Really Want?

The Bottom Line on How to Figure Out Your Macros


macronutrient calculator bodybuilding


The number of calories you eat and how they break down into protein, carbs, and fat has more impact on your physique than what foods you eat and when you eat them.

In short, your body weight depends on calories in versus calories out, and:

If you want to lose weight, you need to eat fewer calories than you burn every day.
If you want to gain weight, you need to eat more calories than you burn every day.
If you want to maintain your weight, you need to eat more or less the same number of calories you burn every day.

And your body composition is heavily influenced by both your calorie and macronutrient intake.

Thus, if you want to lose fat and not muscle, or gain as much muscle and as little fat as possible, you want to pay special attention to how much protein, carbs, and fat you’re eating.

There are many ways to set up your calories and macros, but here’s what I recommend:

If you want to lose fat and not muscle, you want to eat …

75 percent of your TDEE every day
40 percent of your calories should come from protein
40 percent of your calories should come from carbohydrate
20 percent of your calories should come from dietary fat

If you want to gain muscle with minimal fat gain, you want to eat …

110 percent of your TDEE every day
25 percent of your calories should come from protein
55 percent of your calories should come from carbohydrate
20 percent of your calories should come from dietary fat

And if you want to maintain your body composition, you want to eat …

100 percent of your TDEE every day
30 percent of your calories should come from protein
40 percent of your calories should come from carbohydrate
25 percent of your calories should come from dietary fat

Or, you can just plug your numbers into the Legion macronutrient calculator, and it’ll do the heavy lifting for you!

Once you’ve figured out your calories and macros, you want to take your targets and turn them into a sustainable, enjoyable meal plan. These articles will teach you how:

The Definitive Guide to Effective Meal Planning

How to Make Meal Plans That Work For Any Diet

7 Tips for Making Perfect Meal Plans for Weight Loss

If you follow the instructions in these articles and consistently stick to your meal plan, you can lose fat and gain muscle like clockwork.

That said, if you’re unsure of what to do or you’d rather have someone else do all of the work, I can help.

If you just want a paint-by-the-numbers simple pre-made meal plan for losing fat or building muscle, check out our Legion cutting and lean bulking meal plans for men and women.

And if you don’t like the food choices on those meal plans or want a plan custom-tailored to your unique needs, check out our Legion custom meal plan service. In this case, a member of my team will work with you to create a meal plan from scratch that’s perfectly suited to your goals, preferences, and dietary needs.

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