Body building

Incorporate Pre- and Submit-Exhaustion Coaching into Your Program for Larger Features

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In most beginners' exercise books, it is common practice to prescribe multiple joint movements (eg, squats, bench presses, deadlifts, etc.) at the beginning of the workout, followed by isolation exercises (eg, biceps curls, leg curls, triceps extensions) , Etc.).

In the 1960s, Arthur Jones proposed the opposite (an isolation exercise performed just prior to a compound exercise) and referred to it as training against exhaustion.

The idea behind this form of training is to avoid the situation where a smaller muscle group in front of a large muscle group fails during a compound workout. A simple example would be if the triceps gets tired in front of the pectoral muscle during bench press. Let's take this training method to the next level.

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Introduction to training before and after the exhaust

This training method consists of a huge set of three exercises and combines training methods before and after the exhaust.

You may be familiar with the post-exhaust training method. Basically, it is a compound exercise followed by an isolation exercise.

An example of this is a chin paired with a push on the straight arm (to further fatigue the lats) or a bicep curvature (to further fatigue the arms). The idea behind this training method is to further fatigue the major or minor muscle group involved in the compound exercise.

Creating a maximum temporary fatigue of a muscle leads to more muscle damage and the accumulation of more metabolic by-products, both of which are important for muscle growth. But be careful not to overdo it with this type of workout.

It's easy to train and stagnate too much. So listen to your body and maximize your recovery.

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Put the training before and after the exhaust into action

Here are the training parameters:

The weight you use for the compound exercise is less than when doing the exercise itself. So keep your ego at the door and use a lighter weight.
Keep pauses between exercises to a minimum and wait between sets of 60-90 seconds.
The pace of each exercise should be slow and controlled.
Pull the affected muscle together as close to the end of the range as possible for a full second.

Giant set 1:

* /

EXHAUSTIVE GIANT SET 1
exercise
to adjust
representative
Straight arm Press down
3
8 – 10
pull-up
3
Max
Slanted dumbbell bicep curl
3
12

Giant set 2:

* /

EXHAUSTIVE GIANT SET 2
exercise
to adjust
representative
Flat Bank Pec Flyes
3
8 – 10
Bench press with the barbell
3
10
Reject triceps extension
3
12

Giant set 3:

* /

EXHAUSTIVE GIANT SET 3
exercise
to adjust
representative
knee extension
3
8 – 10
Barbell squats
3
10
Hamstring curls on swiss-ball
3
12

Giant set 4:

* /
EXHAUSTIVE GIANT SET 4
exercise
to adjust
representative
Lift front
3
8 – 10
Barbell overhead press
3
10
Lateral lift
3
12

Jon-Erik Kawamoto, CSCS, CEPis a strength trainer and fitness writer from St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada. He is a regular contributor to many major health and fitness magazines and websites, and is currently in the middle of a master's degree in motion physiology at Memorial University. More information about his work can be found at www.JKConditioning.com. Follow him on Twitter @JKConditioning.

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